Aboriginal Women Deserve a Public Inquiry.


We Canadians have always been proud of ourselves; we are a democratic society ruled by the will of the people. We vote and the majority governs, represents our interests, and crafts the laws accordingly -or does it? We have a say in what happens in our several levels of government –a voice in what is done to us… Unless we are a minority. Then we must depend upon the goodwill of those in power to understand and protect our interests. We must trust that, in their blinkered majority, they will not abuse us. Neglect us. Forget us.

But suppose they do. Suppose they surround themselves with their own advisors and see the world through their own lenses, their own authority, their own priorities? Suppose they don’t even understand that anyone could see things differently..? History, after all, is written by the victors, and culture by the dominant.

A case in point is the growing concern in Canada over a series of  missing and murdered aboriginal women –over 1000 in the past 30 years: http://www.nwac.ca/files/download/NWAC_3D_Toolkit_e_0.pdf

There have been various attempts to address the problems of  our First Nations –from a 1996 Royal Commission on Aboriginal People (http://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1307458586498/1307458751962 ) which did not address the issue of the missing women, to a Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Task Force in 2011 (http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/pubs/mmaw-faapd-eng.pdf ) which apparently did…

But the problem remains and the perception that it is not really being addressed is building. In fairness, though, solutions are not only complex, but also expensive and so excuses are rife and rationalizations abundant. Missing women –murdered women- are crimes, not sociological phenomena, says the Prime Minister. Then why are aboriginal women –only one of several minorities in Canada- over-represented in the list, says the other side? An inquiry will tell us nothing new so we should put the money  into solving the problem instead, says the government. http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/chelsea-vowel/missing-and-murdered-women_b_5729738.html?utm_hp_ref=email_share  The cheque’s in the mail in other words; we’re looking into it -you might get it tomorrow… Maybe.

And on and on it goes –I am reminded of Macbeth’s Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day, to the last syllable of recorded time…  Authority versus Minority. Civitas versus Communitas

But hold on; I think both sides are missing something: a conversation closes when one side or the other is adamant that only their view is the correct one.  Dialogue is an exchange of ideas on a particular issue whose aim should be to reach a consensus, an amicable settlement agreeable to both sides. Dialogue is communal, discursive at times, but inclusive. It does not stem from authority, nor resort to it especially when all have not been heard.

Autonomy -the right to make an informed choice- is a difficult issue in politics, of course. And because in this context choice usually involves large groups of people, there has to be an accommodation, an appreciation of how any decision might affect the well-being of the rest of the population. It has to be fair, in other words. But more than that, it has to be seen to be fair. And for that to occur, the issue cannot always be resolved by simply resorting to a vote. The majority and its own world-view bias will always win. Some things require discussion. Consensus. Open, accessible and representative input from all affected parties.

A Public Inquiry, by its very nature, invites public participation -a dialogue between those in power and those who aren’t- and a chance for all who are interested to have a say, voice their own opinions. It is healing to be heard –especially for a minority. To discuss things openly and publically often exposes underlying issues that need addressing: poverty, access to services, educational gaps, cultural safety, discrimination… A problem that has been swept under a carpet of denial or ignorance cannot be solved until it is uncovered for all –not just the minority affected- to see and appreciate.

I have discussed relational autonomy in a previous essay. It involves considering information in the cultural context, societal values, and the community needs of the groups involved. It is the expectation of cultural safety that will allow the people to express those needs without fear of ridicule or disdain. And it is what a representative democracy should encourage. Nothing less will do.

It seems to me that we all need to sit around a table somewhere and talk with –not at– each other. Remember Summer Camp when we were kids? As soon as the lights were turned off and the adults had left, we regaled outselves for hours with stories and discussions about what really mattered. Everybody had something to say, and everybody listened. We felt heard; we felt known. And slowly, by the end of the week, no matter our differences and annoying ideosyncrasies, we felt bonded in a community. Although we still remained individuals with different pasts and different futures, and although there were still disagreements we were, at least, no longer strangers. And, if the need arose, we could talk again – and actually listen. Friends can do that.

 

 

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