The Tampon Tax


I have to admit that I am sometimes puzzled. Not, you understand, to suggest that I am omniscient at other times, but merely that I, too, am apt to get lost in the various back alleys of our government. They seldom come with maps; they are not meant for untroubled navigation. In fact, I suspect they are purposely labyrinthine –not to encourage questions, but so you can be misdirected more effectively.

I recognize that to run a bureaucracy, decisions have to be made that may not be popular with some, and that for the sake of continuity and efficiency these should not be subject to change on a whim. But sometimes their perusal in daylight reveals egregious errors in judgement, wisdom and even fairness. I also realize that in a caring society, those less fortunate than the majority, those with unmet needs, and those who are unable to access the ears of government should be folded into its bosom. For example, items necessary for health or daily living are usually exempt from extra taxation –value-added taxes (Goods and Services Tax –GST in Canada). It is an assurance that those with special needs –incontinence products, for example- will not be unduly penalized. Admittedly, it is only a small concession, but at least it is an acknowledgement that we are all part of a community, an affirmation that we are all noticed and our differences accepted, if not totally underwritten. There are benefits accruing to membership in Society.

Of course in a democracy the majority will derive the most benefits, if only because it has chosen the government. As long as the minority is not oppressed, ignored, or denied the benefits offered to the rest, I think this is reasonable –or at least the most ethical compromise short of requiring them to abrogate their identity, or leave the country if this is not possible. No, Canada is a multicultural mosaic as we are fond of saying; we cherish difference and relish the weft and woof of our societal fabric.

And yet it seems a discrepant appreciation -an arbitrary one still rooted in attitudes so deeply ingrained that they are visible to those in power only through a public outcry when it threatens their incumbency.

I have long wondered about society’s attitude to menstruation: https://musingsonwomenshealth.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/menstrual-taboos/

Admittedly, we in the West have come a fair way already. The topic is no longer taboo in our public media and, except for the more provocative advertisements for menstrual products, barely provokes an eyebrow. Necessity is the Mother of conversation. And yet the Canadian Government –and the governments in several other countries as well, it would seem- has yet to hear it. If, as I have said, items necessary for health or daily living are granted a tax exemption, then what has it been thinking all this time? Or do Governments think?

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/02/18/no-tax-on-tampons_n_6705022.html

Why menstrual products should be ignored as necessities is beyond me. It can’t be that the issue is a minority one that can be conveniently hidden, or assuaged by a few photo-ops like those assuring a small northern community that the government is indeed looking into building a skating rink for them; this is a 50% issue. Nor could it be construed as a definitional discrepancy: if contact lenses are covered by the dikat, then there’s certainly no argument to exclude menstrual products. Except…

Well, except that those taxes are probably a rich revenue source, for one thing. But, more troubling, is it a remnant of a long-buried attitude towards women and their place in our society? The previously ignored tip of a huge iceburg? A sleeping tiger that government would rather step around –ignore but not arouse?

There are braver souls, however. Individual colours that have managed to disengage themselves from the wallpaper we all wear. Patterns previously unappreciated as they slept undisturbed and unprovoked in the background:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/tampon-tax-petition-collects-more-than-50-000-signatures-1.2974155

It would be well for those in charge to walk carefully. The tiger is huge. Feed it. Nourish it. Befriend it.

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