The Skirt’s the Thing


Skirts are back in the news –this time in France… for being too long

You’re kidding! A skirt’s a skirt, right? They’ve been around for thousands of years it would seem, albeit of multiple lengths and designs that accorded with local customs and –perhaps- fashions. The wearers were, of course, were no doubt sometimes tempted to flout the prevailing dress codes and deviate from what was common practice. This risked social approbrium at first, but eventually, as nowadays, also risked becoming the norm. We all flirt with change. We all want to be noticed on occasion –and, at least in the Western world, unique clothing is often a fledgling’s first dangle outside the nest. An experiment in independence.

But what is this deviation –this anti-Fashion- and can we ever differentiate it from protest? Isn’t it always about change? A statement of belonging –or not belonging- to a particular group? An identification for any who care to notice?

Indeed there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that the brains of teenagers, for example, are not just young, unruly adult brains. They differ in neural connections, and although intellectually comparable to those of adults, lack the impulse control that develops with maturity. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-teen-brain-still-under-construction/index.shtml And this is not all bad. For example, Scientists believe that the loss of synapses as a child matures is part of the process by which the brain becomes more efficient. Although genes play a role in the decline in synapses, animal research has shown that experience also shapes the decline. Synapses “exercised” by experience survive and are strengthened, while others are pruned away. From a societal –but mainly, an evolutionary­- standpoint, this is probably a good thing: it encourages new thinking, new perspectives. Innovation.

But what has all this to do with long skirts, I hear you mumbling? Well:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-32510606­

What bothers me is that a girl in France, along with several of her friends, was sent home from school for wearing a long (black) skirt –a 15 year old, Muslim girl no less…

In 2004, France introduced a ban on ‘conspicuous’ religious symbols at state schools in an attempt to enforce its secular version of separation of religion and state. The orginal issue seems to have been Islamic headwear.

But the girls had already removed their Islamic headscarves before entering the school! So what was the issue? The Toronto Star reported that: “It was a concerted action… with a will to put a (religious) identity on display,” Patrice Dutot, inspector of the Ardennes Academy, which oversees the schools in the area, commented by telephone: “It is not the long skirt that is the problem,” Dutot said. The issue is that the girls “had agreed to wear the same skirts… to display their belonging” to a religious group.

Stuff and nonsense! They are teenagers striving for an identity in a society that is bent on a futile quest for homogeneity. If they had decided to dye their hair green, or worn rings in their noses instead, they may well have been tolerated. But even if they were admonished it would not have had the same effect as stigmatizing an entire segment of society –France has about 5 million Muslims which is the largest Muslim minority in Western Europe.

I think it is a policy gone recklessly wrong! While I do not agree with their ban on conspicuous headscarves, if the argument was that the very ostentatiousness of a niqab identified the wearers as members of a religious group, surely the decidedly unpretentious length of a skirt is an individual prerogative –a fashion statement, even. Witness the popularity of the hashtag #JePorteMaJupeCommeJeVeux (I wear my skirt how I want)!

As the BBC reports: In 2011 France became the first European country to ban the full-face Islamic veil – the niqab – in public places. Most of the population – including most Muslims – agree with the government when it describes the face-covering veil as an affront to society’s values.

You’ve made your point, France. Don’t push it too far, though: the lion only slumbers.

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